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City of Saint John Observes 2011 Day of Mourning


Flags at City Hall to be Lowered to Half Mast

Saint John, NB - The City of Saint John and the Saint John Police Force have will join with Worksafe NB and the New Brunswick Federation of Labour in observing the 2011 Day of Mourning, Thursday, April 28. Flags at City Hall and other municipal buildings will be lowered to half mast.
On April 28, officials from the City of Saint John will also be attending ceremonies at Worksafe NB in Saint John including the dedication of a monument at the Lily Lake Pavilion erected to honour workers killed or injured on the job.

The National Day of Mourning commemorates workers whose lives have been lost or injured in the workplace.

At the April 26 meeting of Common Council, Mayor Ivan Court asked for a moment of silence in recognition of the day and read a proclamation stating that “concerned Canadians are determined to prevent these tragedies by rededicating ourselves to improving safety and health in all Canadian workplaces.”

In 2009, The City of Saint John and the Saint John Police Force, in partnership with Worksafe NB, implemented the 5*22 Safety Management System. Workplace accidents at the City have decreased since its inception.
Part of the program is the “We look after the City – Please look out for us” summer campaign. The campaign uses City workers to warn drivers to “look out” for workers who often need to be in the right-of-way in traffic to perform their jobs.

“Safe and healthy workplaces result from the dedicated efforts of management staff working closely with all employees to eliminate hazards and prevent workplace accidents," said Peter Morgan, Safety Manager for the City of Saint John. “In Saint John our workplaces are often include City streets. Through the summer safety campaign, we are asking the public to work with us to ensure our employees are safe.”

The National Day of Mourning is held annually on April 28, and was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after it was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress.